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2 May 21, 09:16 PM
Joy: Thank you Valentina and everyone who participated.
2 May 21, 09:15 PM
Joy: 9. How do we mentally offering our body in ordinary aspect please give an example? Please give one reason for offering our body?

- How we mentally OFFER our body in ordinary aspect, would be, we can take the form of giving service to our spiritual masters and help to beings in need.
- Example: There was once a practitioner who failed to serve his spiritual master well while he was alive. When the master finally passed away, the disciple realized his mistakes with regret. Since nothing he could do would alter the actual situation, he began regularly to imagine performing backbreaking labor for his master. He carried stones, buckets of water and so forth while imagining that he was helping countless beings. He further imagined that he thereby fulfilled his spiritual master’s wishes and so redeemed his past behavior.
- We can also offer our body by transforming it into the aspect of a wish-fulfilling jewel, which can satisfy the needs of all. From it emanate innumerable offerings in the form of jewels, victory banners, umbrellas and so forth which radiate out to all beings, from the enlightened Buddhas down to the most insignificant insects. 

2 May 21, 09:11 PM
Pastor Shin: A9. Mentally offering the body in its ordinary aspect, can take the form of giving service to our spiritual masters and help to beings in need. There was once a practitioner who failed to serve his spiritual master well while he was alive. When the master finally passed away, the disciple realized his mistakes with regret. Since nothing he could do would alter the actual situation, he began regularly to imagine performing backbreaking labor for his master. He carried stones, buckets of water and so forth while imagining that he was helping countless beings. He further imagined that he thereby fulfilled his spiritual master’s wishes and so redeemed his past behavior. Another reason for offering our body in its ordinary form is to seek protection.
2 May 21, 09:10 PM
Pastor Shin: A8. The first bowl contains clear water for the newly arrived guests to drink. The water should be imagined as pure as nectar and offered in vessels made of precious substances.


The second bowl is water for the guest to wash his or her foot.


The third bowl are flowers, reminiscent of the crowns of flowers offered to women and the garlands offered to men.


The fourth bowl is incense, an offering to please the sense of smell. In the imagination billowing clouds of fragrant incense are offered.


The fifth offering, pleasing to sight, is bright light commonly in the form of a lamp, which like the sun and the moon illuminates darkness. This light is imagined to be so clear that you can see even the smallest atoms without obstruction.

The sixth offering consists of a bowl of scented water. Intended to soothe the mind, it is applied at the heart.

The seventh is an offering of food, commonly in the form of a torma or ritual cake.
2 May 21, 09:09 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Antoinette - chat with you again next week - Pastor Antoinette: Yes Valentina. It is an important article.
2 May 21, 09:09 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Joy
2 May 21, 09:08 PM
Joy: 8. The traditional eight bowl set of water/ sensory offerings is derived from the customary offerings presented to an honored guest in ancient India. What is the meaning of each bowl?

- The first bowl contains clear water for the newly arrived guests to drink. The water should be imagined as pure as nectar and offered in vessels made of precious substances.
- In the second bowl is water for the guest to wash his or her feet; a reminder that in India people walked barefoot.
- In the third bowl are flowers, reminiscent of the crowns of flowers offered to women and the garlands offered to men. Masses of fragrant, beautiful flowers can be called up in the imagination.
- In the fourth bowl is incense, an offering to please the sense of smell. In the imagination billowing clouds of fragrant incense are offered.
- The fifth offering, pleasing to sight, is bright light commonly in the form of a lamp, which like the sun and the moon illuminates darkness. This light is imagined to be so clear that you can see even the smallest atoms without obstruction. Sometimes colored lights are offered and imagined to be emanating from nectar. Light is imagined as dispelling the darkness of ignorance.
- The sixth offering consists of a bowl of scented water. Intended to soothe the mind, it is applied at the heart.
- Seventh is an offering of food, commonly in the form of a torma or ritual cake. In India, this offering traditionally contained three sweet substances: molasses, honey and sugar and three white substances: curd, butter and milk. In Tibet, these would be mixed with tsampa or parched barley flour to make an offering cake. The result is like ambrosia, pleasing in color, form, smell and taste.
- Eighth is an offering of sound. It is not represented on the altar, but can simply be imagined as beautiful music.
2 May 21, 09:08 PM
Pastor Antoinette: Yes Valentina. It is an important article.
2 May 21, 09:08 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Rinpoche and all participants and don't forget to do your dedication. Most of all, stay safe!
2 May 21, 09:07 PM
Jacinta: Good night and Thank you Rinpoche, Pastors and everyone.
2 May 21, 09:07 PM
Valentina_moderator: We have come to the end of our chat session. Although we cover less questions than usual I think all of us learn a lot from this insightful post :)
2 May 21, 09:07 PM
Jacinta: I see.. Thank you so much.
2 May 21, 09:07 PM
Callista: life is short
2 May 21, 09:07 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): Thank you Rinpoche, Valentina, Pastors and everyone. Good night and stay safe.
2 May 21, 09:07 PM
Callista: Really pleasure to be here:)
2 May 21, 09:06 PM
Pastor Antoinette: Thank you Rinpoche, thank you Valentina and everyone. Have a good evening and week ahead. Stay safe.
2 May 21, 09:06 PM
Valentina_moderator: 9. How do we mentally offering our body in ordinary aspect please give an example? Please give one reason for offering our body?

ANS 9

Mentally offering the body in its ordinary aspect, can take the form of giving service to our spiritual masters and help to beings in need. There was once a practitioner who failed to serve his spiritual master well while he was alive. When the master finally passed away, the disciple realized his mistakes with regret. Since nothing he could do would alter the actual situation, he began regularly to imagine performing backbreaking labor for his master. He carried stones, buckets of water and so forth while imagining that he was helping countless beings. He further imagined that he thereby fulfilled his spiritual master’s wishes and so redeemed his past behavior.

A reason for offering our body in its ordinary form is to seek protection. If a man offers his body to a king and the king accepts it, the man becomes the king’s subject and as such enjoy his protection. Similarly seeking mere physical protection from exalted beings is the motivation of someone with limited aspirations. The desire for protection however, can be extended beyond mere physical defense to protection from obstacles on the path to enlightenment. In exchange for pledging body, speech and mind to the attainment of enlightenment for the benefit of all sentient beings, the practitioner can receive support and protection from a meditational deity or protector.
2 May 21, 09:06 PM
Valentina_moderator: Good night Callista thank you for joining us today :)
2 May 21, 09:06 PM
Callista: Good night and thanks to Rinpoche, Pastors,Valentina and everyone...
2 May 21, 09:05 PM
Valentina_moderator: No worries Jacinta - The key to the question how do we offer our body mentally in ordinary aspect as it is. It can be in the form of giving service to others :)
2 May 21, 09:04 PM
Jacinta: I took from the last paragraph for that section. Maybe I didn't phrase it properly. 🙏 Sorry
2 May 21, 09:02 PM
Valentina_moderator: 8. The traditional eight bowl set of water/ sensory offerings is derived from the customary offerings presented to an honored guest in ancient India. What is the meaning of each bowl?

ANS 8:

The meaning of eight bowl set of water/ sensory offerings:

> The first bowl contains clear water for the newly arrived guests to drink. The water should be imagined as pure as nectar and offered in vessels made of precious substances.
> The second bowl is water for the guest to wash his or her feet; a reminder that in India people walked barefoot.
> The third bowl are flowers, reminiscent of the crowns of flowers offered to women and the garlands offered to men. Masses of fragrant, beautiful flowers can be called up in the imagination.
> The fourth bowl is incense, an offering to please the sense of smell. In the imagination billowing clouds of fragrant incense are offered.
> The fifth offering, pleasing to sight, is bright light commonly in the form of a lamp, which like the sun and the moon illuminates darkness. This light is imagined to be so clear that you can see even the smallest atoms without obstruction. Sometimes colored lights are offered and imagined to be emanating from nectar. In Tibetan tradition different colors are believed to have various healing properties. Colored or not, the light offered should be very clear. Light is imagined as dispelling the darkness of ignorance. Shariputra, the Buddha’s main disciple renowned for his intelligence, had, in a previous life, offered a bright light before a stupa. As a result he was reborn with great intelligence.
> The sixth offering consists of a bowl of scented water. Intended to soothe the mind, it is applied at the heart.
> The seventh is an offering of food, commonly in the form of a torma or ritual cake. In India, this offering traditionally contained three sweet substances: molasses, honey and sugar and three white substances: curd, butter and milk. In Tibet, these would be mixed with
2 May 21, 09:02 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Yee Mun
2 May 21, 09:02 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Joy
2 May 21, 09:02 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A9 : Mentally offering the body in its ordinary aspect, can take the form of giving service to our spiritual masters and help to beings in need. There was once a practitioner who failed to serve his spiritual master well while he was alive. When the master finally passed away, the disciple realized his mistakes with regret. Since nothing he could do would alter the actual situation, he began regularly to imagine performing backbreaking labor for his master. He carried stones, buckets of water and so forth while imagining that he was helping countless beings. He further imagined that he thereby fulfilled his spiritual master’s wishes and so redeemed his past behavior. Another reason for offering our body in its ordinary form is to seek protection.
2 May 21, 09:02 PM
Valentina_moderator: Yes Pastor Antoinette and Callista and Pastor Adeline -offering our body in the ordinary aspect can be in the form of giving service either to our teacher or those in need
2 May 21, 09:02 PM
Joy: 7. What is the principal obstacle to give? How does someone who suffer from this obstacle can overcome their attachment?

- The principal obstacle to giving is avarice, our attachment to possessions and our reluctance to part with them.
- How someone who suffer from this obstacle can overcome their attachment is to reflect on impermanence.
- We bring to mind all the people and objects we are attached to and reflect that at the time of death we will have to part from them all: body, wealth, close relatives and dearest friends.
- No one is exempt from this; a king leaves behind his palace, a rich man his wealth and a beggar, his stick. We can also reflect on the positive fruits of giving according to the principles of causality.
- Although we should not dwell on what we might receive in return when we give something ourselves, it can be encouraging to remind ourselves and others of the positive effects of giving.
- That generosity is the principal cause of wealth in future lives, for example, can function as an attractive incentive for someone otherwise not inclined to give.
- Acquiring resources through giving can also be justified by the need for at least basic material facilities, if we are to achieve the ultimate goal of perfect Buddhahood for the welfare of all sentient beings.
2 May 21, 09:01 PM
Pastor Adeline: A9. Mentally offering the body in its ordinary aspect, can take the form of giving service to our spiritual masters and help to beings in need. There was once a practitioner who failed to serve his spiritual master well while he was alive. When the master finally passed away, the disciple realized his mistakes with regret. Since nothing he could do would alter the actual situation, he began regularly to imagine performing backbreaking labor for his master. He carried stones, buckets of water and so forth while imagining that he was helping countless beings. He further imagined that he thereby fulfilled his spiritual master’s wishes and so redeemed his past behavior.

Another reason for offering our body in its ordinary form is to seek protection. If a man offers his body to a king and the king accepts it, the man becomes the king’s subject and as such enjoys his protection. Similarly seeking mere physical protection from exalted beings is the motivation of someone with limited aspirations. The desire for protection however, can be extended beyond mere physical defense to protection from obstacles on the path to enlightenment. In exchange for pledging body, speech and mind to the attainment of enlightenment for the benefit of all sentient beings, the practitioner can receive support and protection from a meditational deity or protector.

2 May 21, 09:01 PM
Callista: A9:Mentally offering the body in its ordinary aspect, can take the form of giving service to our spiritual masters and help to beings in need.
Offering the body is to visualize it in the form of a deity, free from ordinary appearances. The aim of this practice is to put a stop to ordinary appearances and to attain the great bliss which is dependent on the six senses.
2 May 21, 09:00 PM
Valentina_moderator: Jacinta - not quite :)
2 May 21, 09:00 PM
Pastor Antoinette: 9. How do we mentally offering our body in ordinary aspect please give an example? Please give one reason for offering our body?

Mentally offering the body in its ordinary aspect, can take the form of giving service to our spiritual masters and help to beings in need.

Example: There was once a practitioner who failed to serve his spiritual master well while he was alive. When the master finally passed away, the disciple realized his mistakes with regret. Since nothing he could do would alter the actual situation, he began regularly to imagine performing backbreaking labor for his master. He carried stones, buckets of water and so forth while imagining that he was helping countless beings. He further imagined that he thereby fulfilled his spiritual master’s wishes and so redeemed his past behavior.
2 May 21, 09:00 PM
Jacinta: A9. One way is by offering the body is to visualize it in the form of a deity, free from ordinary appearances. Usually this comes with initiation and commitments. Hence, guidance from a qualified master is advisable. The aim of this practice is to put a stop to ordinary appearances and to attain the great bliss which is dependent on the six senses.
2 May 21, 09:00 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Shin
2 May 21, 08:59 PM
Pastor Shin: A7. The principal obstacle to giving is avarice, our attachment to possessions and our reluctance to part with them.

An effective antidote to avarice is to reflect on impermanence. We bring to mind all the people and objects we are attached to and reflect that at the time of death we will have to part from them all: body, wealth, close relatives and dearest friends. Avaricious people who wish to overcome their attachment can begin gradually, to accustom their minds to giving. First they can give away small things.
2 May 21, 08:59 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Adeline for you 2 part answer :)
2 May 21, 08:59 PM
Pastor Adeline: A8. PART 2

Seventh is an offering of food, commonly in the form of a torma or ritual cake. In India, this offering traditionally contained three sweet substances: molasses, honey and sugar and three white substances: curd, butter and milk. In Tibet, these would be mixed with tsampa or parched barley flour to make an offering cake. The result is like ambrosia, pleasing in color, form, smell and taste.

Eighth is an offering of sound. It is not represented on the altar, but can simply be imagined as beautiful music.
2 May 21, 08:58 PM
Pastor Adeline: A8. The traditional set of offerings, commonly represented by bowls of water, derives from the customary offerings presented to an honored guest in ancient India.

The first bowl contains clear water for the newly arrived guests to drink. The water should be imagined as pure as nectar and offered in vessels made of precious substances.

In the second bowl is water for the guest to wash his or her feet; a reminder that in India people walked barefoot.

In the third bowl are flowers, reminiscent of the crowns of flowers offered to women and the garlands offered to men. Masses of fragrant, beautiful flowers can be called up in the imagination.

In the fourth bowl is incense, an offering to please the sense of smell. In the imagination billowing clouds of fragrant incense are offered.

The fifth offering, pleasing to sight, is bright light commonly in the form of a lamp, which like the sun and the moon illuminates darkness. This light is imagined to be so clear that you can see even the smallest atoms without obstruction. Sometimes colored lights are offered and imagined to be emanating from nectar. In Tibetan tradition different colors are believed to have various healing properties. Colored or not, the light offered should be very clear. Light is imagined as dispelling the darkness of ignorance. Shariputra, the Buddha’s main disciple renowned for his intelligence, had, in a previous life, offered a bright light before a stupa. As a result he was reborn with great intelligence.

The sixth offering consists of a bowl of scented water. Intended to soothe the mind, it is applied at the heart.

PART 1
2 May 21, 08:58 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Callista
2 May 21, 08:57 PM
Callista: A8: 1st bowl contains clear water for the newly arrived guests to drink. The water should be imagined as pure as nectar and offered in vessels made of precious substances. 2nd bowl is water for the guest to wash his or her feet; a reminder that in India people walked barefoot.
3rd bowl are flowers, reminiscent of the crowns of flowers offered to women and the garlands offered to men. Masses of fragrant, beautiful flowers can be called up in the imagination.
4th bowl is incense, an offering to please the sense of smell. In the imagination billowing clouds of fragrant incense are offered.
The 5th offering, pleasing to sight, is bright light commonly in the form of a lamp, which like the sun and the moon illuminates darkness. This light is imagined to be so clear that you can see even the smallest atoms without obstruction. Sometimes colored lights are offered and imagined to be emanating from nectar. In Tibetan tradition different colors are believed to have various healing properties. Colored or not, the light offered should be very clear. Light is imagined as dispelling the darkness of ignorance. Shariputra, the Buddha’s main disciple renowned for his intelligence, had, in a previous life, offered a bright light before a stupa. As a result he was reborn with great intelligence
The 6th offering consists of a bowl of scented water. Intended to soothe the mind, it is applied at the heart.
7th food offering, commonly in the form of a torma or ritual cake. In India, this offering traditionally contained three sweet substances: molasses, honey and sugar and three white substances: curd, butter and milk. In Tibet, these would be mixed with tsampa or parched barley flour to make an offering cake. The result is like ambrosia, pleasing in color, form, smell and taste.
8th offering sound. can simply be imagined as beautiful music.
2 May 21, 08:56 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Shin
2 May 21, 08:56 PM
Valentina_moderator: 9. How do we mentally offering our body in ordinary aspect please give an example? Please give one reason for offering our body?
2 May 21, 08:56 PM
Valentina_moderator: Last question of the day
2 May 21, 08:56 PM
Pastor Shin: A6. The small amount of merit we earn through such a virtuous action as giving can be compared to a drop, which, when dedicated to the welfare of all sentient beings, is cast into the ocean of merit accumulated by all the Buddhas and bodhisattvas: When a drop of water mingles with the ocean, it becomes virtually inexhaustible. Similarly, when correctly dedicating our merit, like casting it into the ocean of merit created by Buddhas and bodhisattvas, being of a similar nature it will likewise be inexhaustible. If, on the other hand, we dedicate our merit to some worldly end, it is like throwing a stone into the ocean. Being of a different nature from that of the Buddhas, our merit will not become one with theirs, but will remain like a small pebble lying on the ocean floor.
2 May 21, 08:56 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Yee Mun, Joy and Jacinta
2 May 21, 08:56 PM
Jacinta: A8. For drinking, wash feet, flowers for fragrant, incense to please sense of smell, lamp to please the sight, scented water to soothe the mind, food and offering of sound.
2 May 21, 08:56 PM
Joy: 6. Why does the giver need to dedicate his/her merits after performing the act of giving?

- After performing the act of giving it is necessary for the giver to do dedication because although a mindful and conscientious practitioner will maintain a sufficiently positive motivation to attain the highest fruit from the virtue of giving.
- However, if a practitioner has not set the right motivation at the time of performing the action, he or she can still correct and redirect the virtue at the end by dedicating it to the welfare of all sentient beings.
- The small amount of merit we earn through such a virtuous action as giving can be compared to a drop, which, when dedicated to the welfare of all sentient beings, is cast into the ocean of merit accumulated by all the Buddhas and bodhisattvas: When a drop of water mingles with the ocean, it becomes virtually inexhaustible.
- Similarly, when correctly dedicating our merit, like casting it into the ocean of merit created by Buddhas and bodhisattvas, being of a similar nature it will likewise be inexhaustible.
- If, on the other hand, we dedicate our merit to some worldly end, it is like throwing a stone into the ocean. Being of a different nature from that of the Buddhas, our merit will not become one with theirs, but will remain like a small pebble lying on the ocean floor.
2 May 21, 08:55 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A8 : The first bowl contains clear water for the newly arrived guests to drink.

In the second bowl is water for the guest to wash his or her feet; a reminder that in India people walked barefoot.

In the third bowl are flowers, reminiscent of the crowns of flowers offered to women and the garlands offered to men.

In the fourth bowl is incense, an offering to please the sense of smell.

The fifth offering, pleasing to sight, is bright light commonly in the form of a lamp, which like the sun and the moon illuminates darkness.

The sixth offering consists of a bowl of scented water.
Seventh is an offering of food, commonly in the form of a torma or ritual cake.

Eighth is an offering of sound.
2 May 21, 08:55 PM
Valentina_moderator: 7. What is the principal obstacle to give? How does someone who suffer from this obstacle can overcome their attachment?

ANS 7:

The principal obstacle to giving is avarice, our attachment to possessions and our reluctance to part with them. An effective antidote to avarice is to reflect on impermanence. We bring to mind all the people and objects we are attached to and reflect that at the time of death we will have to part from them all: body, wealth, close relatives and dearest friends. No one is exempt from this; a king leaves behind his palace, a rich man his wealth and a beggar, his stick. We can also reflect on the positive fruits of giving according to the principles of causality. Although we should not dwell on what we might receive in return when we give something ourselves, it can be encouraging to remind ourselves and others of the positive effects of giving. That generosity is the principal cause of wealth in future lives, for example, can function as an attractive incentive for someone otherwise not inclined to give. Acquiring resources through giving can also be justified by the need for at least basic material facilities, if we are to achieve the ultimate goal of perfect Buddhahood for the welfare of all sentient beings.

Avaricious people who wish to overcome their attachment can begin gradually, to accustom their minds to giving. First they can give away small things. At the time of the Buddha, there was a wealthy merchant known for his miserliness. One day, he came to see the Buddha and told him that however hard he tried, he could not bear the thought of even giving water to someone begging at his door. The Buddha advised him to take some grain in his hand and pass it from one hand to the other and to think that one hand was giving to the other. This is how he began to accustom himself to the simple notion of giving.
2 May 21, 08:55 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Antoinette - I often get this question from the newbies when they see 8 sensory offering or water offering bowls for the first time :)
2 May 21, 08:54 PM
Pastor Antoinette: 8. The traditional eight bowl set of water/ sensory offerings is derived from the customary offerings presented to an honored guest in ancient India. What is the meaning of each bowl?

The first bowl contains clear water for the newly arrived guests to drink. The water should be imagined as pure as nectar and offered in vessels made of precious substances.
In the second bowl is water for the guest to wash his or her feet; a reminder that in India people walked barefoot.
In the third bowl are flowers, reminiscent of the crowns of flowers offered to women and the garlands offered to men. Masses of fragrant, beautiful flowers can be called up in the imagination.
In the fourth bowl is incense, an offering to please the sense of smell. In the imagination billowing clouds of fragrant incense are offered.
The fifth offering, pleasing to sight, is bright light commonly in the form of a lamp, which like the sun and the moon illuminates darkness. This light is imagined to be so clear that you can see even the smallest atoms without obstruction. Sometimes colored lights are offered and imagined to be emanating from nectar. In Tibetan tradition different colors are believed to have various healing properties. Colored or not, the light offered should be very clear. Light is imagined as dispelling the darkness of ignorance.
The sixth offering consists of a bowl of scented water. Intended to soothe the mind, it is applied at the heart.
Seventh is an offering of food, commonly in the form of a torma or ritual cake. In India, this offering traditionally contained three sweet substances: molasses, honey and sugar and three white substances: curd, butter and milk. In Tibet, these would be mixed with tsampa or parched barley flour to make an offering cake. The result is like ambrosia, pleasing in color, form, smell and taste.
Eighth is an offering of sound. It is not represented on the altar, but can simply be imagined as beautiful music.
2 May 21, 08:53 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Adeline
2 May 21, 08:53 PM
Pastor Adeline: A7. The principal obstacle to giving is avarice, our attachment to possessions and our reluctance to part with them. An effective antidote to avarice is to reflect on impermanence. We bring to mind all the people and objects we are attached to and reflect that at the time of death we will have to part from them all: body, wealth, close relatives and dearest friends. No one is exempt from this; a king leaves behind his palace, a rich man his wealth and a beggar, his stick. We can also reflect on the positive fruits of giving according to the principles of causality.
2 May 21, 08:50 PM
Valentina_moderator: 6. Why does the giver need to dedicate his/her merits after performing the act of giving?

ANS 6

After performing the act of giving it is necessary for the giver to do dedication because although a mindful and conscientious practitioner will maintain a sufficiently positive motivation to attain the highest fruit from the virtue of giving. However, if a practitioner has not set the right motivation at the time of performing the action, he or she can still correct and redirect the virtue at the end by dedicating it to the welfare of all sentient beings.

The small amount of merit we earn through such a virtuous action as giving can be compared to a drop, which, when dedicated to the welfare of all sentient beings, is cast into the ocean of merit accumulated by all the Buddhas and bodhisattvas: When a drop of water mingles with the ocean, it becomes virtually inexhaustible. Similarly, when correctly dedicating our merit, like casting it into the ocean of merit created by Buddhas and bodhisattvas, being of a similar nature it will likewise be inexhaustible. If, on the other hand, we dedicate our merit to some worldly end, it is like throwing a stone into the ocean. Being of a different nature from that of the Buddhas, our merit will not become one with theirs, but will remain like a small pebble lying on the ocean floor.
2 May 21, 08:50 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Jacinta. If only many people do this, the attitude of many will change - Jacinta: Meditation on death is also good. We should give and not accumulate as we cannot bring it with us. Valentina_moderator: Thank you Jacinta and Pastor Antoinette - what advice can you give to Avaricious people to get used to giving?
2 May 21, 08:49 PM
Jacinta: Meditation on death is also good. We should give and not accumulate as we cannot bring it with us. Valentina_moderator: Thank you Jacinta and Pastor Antoinette - what advice can you give to Avaricious people to get used to giving?
2 May 21, 08:49 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Adeline
2 May 21, 08:48 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Callista - this is very good advice - Avaricious people who wish to overcome their attachment can begin gradually, to accustom their minds to giving. First they can give away small things.
2 May 21, 08:48 PM
Pastor Adeline: A6. The small amount of merit we earn through such a virtuous action as giving can be compared to a drop, which, when dedicated to the welfare of all sentient beings, is cast into the ocean of merit accumulated by all the Buddhas and bodhisattvas: When a drop of water mingles with the ocean, it becomes virtually inexhaustible.
2 May 21, 08:48 PM
Callista: A7:The principal obstacle to giving is avarice, our attachment to possessions and our reluctance to part with them. An effective antidote to avarice is to reflect on impermanence.

Avaricious people who wish to overcome their attachment can begin gradually, to accustom their minds to giving. First they can give away small things. At the time of the Buddha, there was a wealthy merchant known for his miserliness. One day, he came to see the Buddha and told him that however hard he tried, he could not bear the thought of even giving water to someone begging at his door. The Buddha advised him to take some grain in his hand and pass it from one hand to the other and to think that one hand was giving to the other. This is how he began to accustom himself to the simple notion of giving.
2 May 21, 08:47 PM
Valentina_moderator: 8. The traditional eight bowl set of water/ sensory offerings is derived from the customary offerings presented to an honored guest in ancient India. What is the meaning of each bowl?
2 May 21, 08:47 PM
Valentina_moderator: For those who are ready, you can proceed to question no. 8
2 May 21, 08:46 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Joy
2 May 21, 08:46 PM
Joy: 5. When focusing on the action, what kind of attitude should we have when giving? What kind of objects is suitable to be given?

- Giving should be direct and straightforward.
- Delaying giving something in order to look more important, or to make people work harder for what they are going to receive reduces the resultant merit.
- Giving should be accompanied by a joyful expression and agreeable words. If we can, it is always better to give with our own hands.
- Objects is suitable to be given: Anything that reflects the giver’s wish to please someone is suitable to be given. At best, a gift should be beneficial both immediately and ultimately. 
If it is not beneficial in the short term, but only in the long term like bitter medicine that takes some time to act, it is suitable.
- When something provides short-term pleasure, but ultimate damage, such as supplying an addict his drug or a drunkard his drink, it would be better to refrain from giving.
2 May 21, 08:45 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Shin
2 May 21, 08:45 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Antoinette and Yee Mun :)
2 May 21, 08:45 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A7 : The principal obstacle to giving is avarice, our attachment to possessions and our reluctance to part with them. An effective antidote to avarice is to reflect on impermanence. We bring to mind all the people and objects we are attached to and reflect that at the time of death we will have to part from them all: body, wealth, close relatives and dearest friends.
2 May 21, 08:45 PM
Pastor Antoinette: @Valentina: We can also reflect on the positive fruits of giving according to the principles of causality. Although we should not dwell on what we might receive in return when we give something ourselves, it can be encouraging to remind ourselves and others of the positive effects of giving. That generosity is the principal cause of wealth in future lives, for example, can function as an attractive incentive for someone otherwise not inclined to give.
2 May 21, 08:44 PM
Pastor Shin: A5. When focusing on the action, giving should be direct and straightforward. Delaying giving something in order to look more important, or to make people work harder for what they are going to receive reduces the resultant merit. Giving should be accompanied by a joyful expression and agreeable words. If we can, it is always better to give with our own hands.

In terms of objects, anything that reflects the giver’s wish to please someone is suitable to be given. At best, a gift should be beneficial both immediately and ultimately. If it is not beneficial in the short term, but only in the long term like bitter medicine that takes some time to act, it is suitable.
2 May 21, 08:44 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Jacinta and Pastor Antoinette - what advice can you give to Avaricious people to get used to giving?
2 May 21, 08:44 PM
Pastor Antoinette: 7. What is the principal obstacle to give? How does someone who suffer from this obstacle can overcome their attachment?

The principal obstacle to giving is avarice, our attachment to possessions and our reluctance to part with them.

An effective antidote to avarice is to reflect on impermanence.
We bring to mind all the people and objects we are attached to and reflect that at the time of death we will have to part from them all: body, wealth, close relatives and dearest friends. No one is exempt from this
2 May 21, 08:43 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Adeline
2 May 21, 08:43 PM
Jacinta: A7. The principal obstacle to giving is avarice, our attachment to possessions and our reluctance to part with them. An effective antidote to avarice is to reflect on impermanence.
2 May 21, 08:42 PM
Valentina_moderator: 5. When focusing on the action, what kind of attitude should we have when giving? What kind of objects is suitable to be given?

ANS 5:

When focusing on the action, giving should be direct and straightforward. Delaying giving something in order to look more important, or to make people work harder for what they are going to receive reduces the resultant merit. Giving should be accompanied by a joyful expression and agreeable words. If we can, it is always better to give with our own hands.

In terms of objects, anything that reflects the giver’s wish to please someone is suitable to be given. At best, a gift should be beneficial both immediately and ultimately. If it is not beneficial in the short term, but only in the long term like bitter medicine that takes some time to act, it is suitable. When something provides short-term pleasure, but ultimate damage, such as supplying an addict his drug or a drunkard his drink, it would be better to refrain from giving.
2 May 21, 08:42 PM
Pastor Adeline: A5. Giving should be direct and straightforward. Delaying giving something in order to look more important, or to make people work harder for what they are going to receive reduces the resultant merit. Giving should be accompanied by a joyful expression and agreeable words. If we can, it is always better to give with our own hands.
2 May 21, 08:42 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Shin
2 May 21, 08:42 PM
Valentina_moderator: 7. What is the principal obstacle to give? How does someone who suffer from this obstacle can overcome their attachment?
2 May 21, 08:42 PM
Pastor Shin: A4. When focusing on the recipient of our giving, we need to view the recipients as like our teachers because they provide us with the opportunity to give. We depend on them to accumulate the merit. Giving is not an occasion to be patronizing or condescending.


When giving to those who are suffering, we should meditate on compassion, mindful of their miseries and strongly wishing that they be parted from them. Making offerings to wise beings such as Buddhas, bodhisattvas and spiritual masters is an occasion for faith and joy. When giving to those who help us, such as our parents or friends, we should give impartially, with equanimity, the basis for developing the awakening mind.
2 May 21, 08:41 PM
Valentina_moderator: For those who are ready, you can proceed to question 7
2 May 21, 08:41 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Adeline and Joy
2 May 21, 08:40 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Jacinta Callista and Yee Mun - yes. The other reasons are to reflect on the motivation and a remedy when the practitioners have not set the right motivation at the time of performing action.
2 May 21, 08:40 PM
Joy: 4. When focusing on the recipient of our giving, what kind of attitude or thoughts should we adopt?

- In providing us with an opportunity to give, those we give to are like teachers. We depend on them to accumulate the merit.
- Because we dislike giving to certain kinds of beings, we have to take counter measures to correct our attitude.
- When somebody appears to be unattractive, we have to try to overcome our aversion by meditating on love.
- Giving to them, offers further opportunity to acquire merit. Giving is not an occasion to be patronizing or condescending.
- When giving to those who are suffering, we should meditate on compassion, mindful of their miseries and strongly wishing that they be parted from them.
2 May 21, 08:39 PM
Callista: A6:The giver can reflect on it and rejoice at the merit he or she has created. When we are actually involved with doing something, we may not remember consciously to set up the correct motivation as described in the scriptures, although for a more advanced practitioner, who has generated a firm awakening mind, the correct motivation arises spontaneously. A mindful and conscientious practitioner will maintain a sufficiently positive motivation to attain the highest fruit from the virtue of giving. However, if a practitioner has not set the right motivation at the time of performing the action, he or she can still correct and redirect the virtue at the end by dedicating it to the welfare of all sentient beings. The small amount of merit we earn through such a virtuous action as giving can be compared to a drop, which, when dedicated to the welfare of all sentient beings, is cast into the ocean of merit accumulated by all the Buddhas and bodhisattvas: When a drop of water mingles with the ocean, it becomes virtually inexhaustible. Similarly, when correctly dedicating our merit, like casting it into the ocean of merit created by Buddhas and bodhisattvas, being of a similar nature it will likewise be inexhaustible. If, on the other hand, we dedicate our merit to some worldly end, it is like throwing a stone into the ocean. Being of a different nature from that of the Buddhas, our merit will not become one with theirs, but will remain like a small pebble lying on the ocean floor.
2 May 21, 08:39 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A6 : If a practitioner has not set the right motivation at the time of performing the action, he or she can still correct and redirect the virtue at the end by dedicating it to the welfare of all sentient beings. The small amount of merit we earn through such a virtuous action as giving can be compared to a drop, which, when dedicated to the welfare of all sentient beings, is cast into the ocean of merit accumulated by all the Buddhas and bodhisattvas: When a drop of water mingles with the ocean, it becomes virtually inexhaustible.
2 May 21, 08:39 PM
Pastor Adeline: A4. When giving to those who are suffering, we should meditate on compassion, mindful of their miseries and strongly wishing that they be parted from them. Making offerings to wise beings such as Buddhas, bodhisattvas and spiritual masters is an occasion for faith and joy. When giving to those who help us, such as our parents or friends, we should give impartially, with equanimity, the basis for developing the awakening mind. Giving is not an opportunity to favor one being over another, for all beings are equal in wishing to be happy. Giving simply to show off and cultivate popularity or to outdo someone else will result in little merit. To give purely, we should do so joyfully without regret, with equanimity and without expectation of any reward.
2 May 21, 08:39 PM
Jacinta: A6. To 'reflect' the motivation behind the action and rejoice for it. Also, we still can correct and redirect the virtue at the end by dedicating it to the welfare of all sentient beings. Rejoicing is one of the four powers to seal our merits.
2 May 21, 08:37 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Antoinette - any other reason anyone?
2 May 21, 08:37 PM
Pastor Antoinette: 6. Why does the giver need to dedicate his/her merits after performing the act of giving?

When correctly dedicating our merit, like casting it into the ocean of merit created by Buddhas and bodhisattvas, being of a similar nature it will likewise be inexhaustible.
2 May 21, 08:34 PM
Valentina_moderator: 4. When focusing on the recipient of our giving, what kind of attitude or thoughts should we adopt?

ANS 4:

When focusing on the recipient of our giving, we need to view the recipients as like our teachers because they provide us with the opportunity to give. We depend on them to accumulate the merit. Because we dislike giving to certain kinds of beings, we have to take counter measures to correct our attitude. When somebody appears to be unattractive, we have to try to overcome our aversion by meditating on love. Giving to them, offers further opportunity to acquire merit. Giving is not an occasion to be patronizing or condescending.

When giving to those who are suffering, we should meditate on compassion, mindful of their miseries and strongly wishing that they be parted from them. Making offerings to wise beings such as Buddhas, bodhisattvas and spiritual masters is an occasion for faith and joy. When giving to those who help us, such as our parents or friends, we should give impartially, with equanimity, the basis for developing the awakening mind.

Giving is not an opportunity to favor one being over another, for all beings are equal in wishing to be happy. Giving simply to show off and cultivate popularity or to outdo someone else will result in little merit. To give purely, we should do so joyfully without regret, with equanimity and without expectation of any reward.
2 May 21, 08:33 PM
Valentina_moderator: 6. Why does the giver need to dedicate his/her merits after performing the act of giving?
2 May 21, 08:33 PM
Valentina_moderator: For those who are ready, you can proceed to question 6
2 May 21, 08:33 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Joy
2 May 21, 08:33 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Callista
2 May 21, 08:33 PM
Joy: giving? Please give one example.
- Motivation or intent consciously or unconsciously precedes all our actions.
- The ultimate motivation for giving is to generate the causes for attaining enlightenment for the welfare of all sentient beings.
- The value of an act of giving closely corresponds to the quality of motivation.
- The narrower the intention, the smaller the merit.
- Example: You may offer a bag of gold to a monastery, but if your real intention is just to show off, to acquire further wealth or a similar worldly motivation, the merit acquired may provide the desired result, but no more.
2 May 21, 08:33 PM
Jacinta: I agree
2 May 21, 08:32 PM
Callista: A5:Giving should be direct and straightforward. Delaying giving something in order to look more important, or to make people work harder for what they are going to receive reduces the resultant merit. Giving should be accompanied by a joyful expression and agreeable words. If we can, it is always better to give with our own hands.Anything that reflects the giver’s wish to please someone is suitable to be given. At best, a gift should be beneficial both immediately and ultimately. If it is not beneficial in the short term, but only in the long term like bitter medicine that takes some time to act, it is suitable. When something provides short-term pleasure, but ultimate damage, such as supplying an addict his drug or a drunkard his drink, it would be better to refrain from giving.

The greater the sacrifice we make, the greater the merit we create. A piece of gold offered by a poor man for whom it represents his entire wealth will earn more merit than when a rich man offers it among many other such pieces.
Giving away part of your body requires a degree of determination that reflects a high level of realization. Beginners cannot readily perform such acts, and if they try to do so are likely to lead to disaster. Even practitioners who have attained sufficient spiritual realization will not give away their bodies for a trivial purpose or to someone demanding it out of malice. It is likewise a mistake to give something to someone who we know will use it to harm others.
2 May 21, 08:32 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Adeline
2 May 21, 08:32 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Jacinta. Yes Giving should be direct and straightforward. We should not use giving as a tool to gain more power, increase our importance, make people do things for us etc. When giving is direct and straightforward, it is beautiful
2 May 21, 08:32 PM
Pastor Adeline: A3. In order to attain highest enlightenment, we must be able to give to a superlative degree, with perfect motivation, thus attaining the unsurpassable level of the perfection of giving.

Motivation or intent consciously or unconsciously precedes all our actions. The ultimate motivation for giving is to generate the causes for attaining enlightenment for the welfare of all sentient beings. The value of an act of giving closely corresponds to the quality of motivation. The narrower the intention, the smaller the merit. You may offer a bag of gold to a monastery, but if your real intention is just to show off, to acquire further wealth or a similar worldly motivation, the merit acquired may provide the desired result, but no more. If you give with a wish to attain liberation from cyclic existence, much greater merit will be generated. And if by giving you aspire to the ultimate attainment of Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings, the merit you acquire will be limitless.
2 May 21, 08:30 PM
Jacinta: A5. Giving should be direct and straightforward. Giving should be accompanied by a joyful expression and agreeable words. If we can, it is always better to give with our own hands.

Anything that reflects the giver’s wish to please someone is suitable to be given. At best, a gift should be beneficial both immediately and ultimately.
2 May 21, 08:30 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Shin, Jacinta, Pastor Antoinette and Yee Mun
2 May 21, 08:30 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Callista. Yes our teacher is a good recipient for our offering.
2 May 21, 08:30 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A5 : Giving should be direct and straightforward. Delaying giving something in order to look more important, or to make people work harder for what they are going to receive reduces the resultant merit. Giving should be accompanied by a joyful expression and agreeable words. If we can, it is always better to give with our own hands. {br][br} Anything that reflects the giver’s wish to please someone is suitable to be given. At best, a gift should be beneficial both immediately and ultimately. If it is not beneficial in the short term, but only in the long term like bitter medicine that takes some time to act, it is suitable. When something provides short-term pleasure, but ultimate damage, such as supplying an addict his drug or a drunkard his drink, it would be better to refrain from giving.
2 May 21, 08:29 PM
Pastor Antoinette: 5. When focusing on the action, what kind of attitude should we have when giving? What kind of objects is suitable to be given?

Giving should be direct and straightforward.
Delaying giving something in order to look more important, or to make people work harder for what they are going to receive reduces the resultant merit.
Giving should be accompanied by a joyful expression and agreeable words. If we can, it is always better to give with our own hands.

Anything that reflects the giver’s wish to please someone is suitable to be given. At best, a gift should be beneficial both immediately and ultimately.

The greater the sacrifice we make, the greater the merit we create. A piece of gold offered by a poor man for whom it represents his entire wealth will earn more merit than when a rich man offers it among many other such pieces.
2 May 21, 08:28 PM
Jacinta: A4. Giving is not an opportunity to favor one being over another. Giving is not to show off and cultivate popularity or to outdo someone else will result in little merit.

When giving to those who are suffering, we should meditate on compassion, mindful of their miseries and strongly wishing that they be parted from them. Making offerings to wise beings such as Buddhas, bodhisattvas and spiritual masters is an occasion for faith and joy. If we dislike giving to certain kinds of beings, we have to take counter measures to correct our attitude. Giving to those appears to be unattractive, we have to try to overcome our aversion by meditating on love.
2 May 21, 08:28 PM
Pastor Shin: A3. The value of an act of giving closely corresponds to the quality of motivation. The narrower the intention, the smaller the merit.

If you give with a wish to attain liberation from cyclic existence, much greater merit will be generated.
2 May 21, 08:28 PM
Callista: A4:An opportunity was given, for us to make offering to our teachers ie HE Tsem Rinpoche. We depend on him to accumulate the merit. Because we dislike giving to certain kinds of beings, we have to take counter measures to correct our attitude. When somebody appears to be unattractive, we have to try to overcome our aversion by meditating on love. Giving to them, offers further opportunity to acquire merit. Giving is not an occasion to be patronizing or condescending. When giving to those who are suffering, we should meditate on compassion, mindful of their miseries and strongly wishing that they be parted from them. Making offerings to wise beings such as Buddhas, bodhisattvas and spiritual masters is an occasion for faith and joy. When giving to those who help us, such as our parents or friends, we should give impartially, with equanimity, the basis for developing the awakening mind. Giving is not an opportunity to favor one being over another, for all beings are equal in wishing to be happy. Giving simply to show off and cultivate popularity or to outdo someone else will result in little merit. To give purely, we should do so joyfully without regret, with equanimity and without expectation of any reward.
2 May 21, 08:27 PM
Valentina_moderator: 3. How does our motivation determine the value of the act of giving? Please give one example.

ANS 3:

The value of an act of giving closely corresponds to the quality of motivation. The narrower the intention, the smaller the merit. If you give with a wish to attain liberation from cyclic existence, much greater merit will be generated. And if by giving you aspire to the ultimate attainment of Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings, the merit you acquire will be limitless.

Example: You may offer a bag of gold to a monastery, but if your real intention is just to show off, to acquire further wealth or a similar worldly motivation, the merit acquired may provide the desired result, but no more.
2 May 21, 08:26 PM
Valentina_moderator: 5. When focusing on the action, what kind of attitude should we have when giving? What kind of objects is suitable to be given?
2 May 21, 08:26 PM
Valentina_moderator: For those who are ready, you can proceed to question no. 5 :)
2 May 21, 08:26 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Antoinette and Yee Mun. I like this particular statement from Panchen Ötrul Rinpoche, "Giving is not an opportunity to favor one being over another, for all beings are equal in wishing to be happy."
2 May 21, 08:24 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A4 :In providing us with an opportunity to give, those we give to are like teachers. We depend on them to accumulate the merit. Because we dislike giving to certain kinds of beings, we have to take counter measures to correct our attitude. When somebody appears to be unattractive, we have to try to overcome our aversion by meditating on love. Giving to them, offers further opportunity to acquire merit. Giving is not an occasion to be patronizing or condescending. When giving to those who are suffering, we should meditate on compassion, mindful of their miseries and strongly wishing that they be parted from them. Making offerings to wise beings such as Buddhas, bodhisattvas and spiritual masters is an occasion for faith and joy. When giving to those who help us, such as our parents or friends, we should give impartially, with equanimity, the basis for developing the awakening mind. Giving is not an opportunity to favor one being over another, for all beings are equal in wishing to be happy. Giving simply to show off and cultivate popularity or to outdo someone else will result in little merit. To give purely, we should do so joyfully without regret, with equanimity and without expectation of any reward.
2 May 21, 08:24 PM
Jacinta: Sorry, just now for A3..
2 May 21, 08:24 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Jacinta - yes that is correct - but I think that is the answer to question 3? - A2. Basically, the narrower the intention, the smaller the merit. Hence, it correspondences directly with the quality of our motivation. If we have genuine and altruistic motivation while making offering, be it benefiting others, or for our own salvation so that in future we can help many others, then it will be the best. But if we offer it up just to look good, then I'll bet we generate the least or no merits at all.
2 May 21, 08:24 PM
Pastor Antoinette: 4. When focusing on the recipient of our giving, what kind of attitude or thoughts should we adopt?

In providing us with an opportunity to give, those we give to are like teachers. We depend on them to accumulate the merit.

When giving to those who are suffering, we should meditate on compassion, mindful of their miseries and strongly wishing that they be parted from them.
Making offerings to wise beings such as Buddhas, bodhisattvas and spiritual masters is an occasion for faith and joy.
When giving to those who help us, such as our parents or friends, we should give impartially, with equanimity, the basis for developing the awakening mind.

Giving is not an opportunity to favor one being over another, for all beings are equal in wishing to be happy.
Giving simply to show off and cultivate popularity or to outdo someone else will result in little merit.

To give purely, we should do so joyfully without regret, with equanimity and without expectation of any reward.
2 May 21, 08:23 PM
Jacinta: A2. Basically, the narrower the intention, the smaller the merit. Hence, it correspondences directly with the quality of our motivation. If we have genuine and altruistic motivation while making offering, be it benefiting others, or for our own salvation so that in future we can help many others, then it will be the best. But if we offer it up just to look good, then I'll bet we generate the least or no merits at all.
2 May 21, 08:22 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Shin
2 May 21, 08:22 PM
Pastor Shin: A2. From a Buddhist practitioner’s point of view as a donor, they are essential means of reducing our attachment to the physical world. Attachment reinforces our notion of ourselves as real, independent selves to be satisfied by obtaining or clinging onto objects we desire. Making offerings accustoms the mind to giving and letting go of desirable objects. It serves to loosen our conception of a real and independent self. In this way, it contributes to our acquiring the essential wisdom realizing that all phenomena as empty of intrinsic existence. Without such realization we will not attain Buddhahood.
2 May 21, 08:21 PM
Valentina_moderator: I think question no. 4 is very interesting as it makes us think about how we should treat the recipient of our giving
2 May 21, 08:20 PM
Valentina_moderator: :)
2 May 21, 08:20 PM
Pastor Antoinette:
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Antoinette for pointing out especially the motivation that we should have to maximize the effect of our giving

Yes, and on top the benefits can be limitless!!
2 May 21, 08:20 PM
Valentina_moderator: 4. When focusing on the recipient of our giving, what kind of attitude or thoughts should we adopt?
2 May 21, 08:20 PM
Valentina_moderator: For those who are ready, you can proceed to question no. 4
2 May 21, 08:19 PM
Valentina_moderator: 2. From a Buddhist practitioner's point of view, why do we make physical offerings? How does making physical offering help to reduce our attachment?

ANS 2:

From a Buddhist practitioner's point of view, making physical offerings are essential means of reducing our attachment to the physical world. Attachment reinforces our notion of ourselves as real, independent selves to be satisfied by obtaining or clinging onto objects we desire.

Making offerings can help to reduce our attachment because it accustoms the mind to giving and letting go of desirable objects. It serves to loosen our conception of a real and independent self. In this way, it contributes to our acquiring the essential wisdom realizing that all phenomena as empty of intrinsic existence. Without such realization we will not attain Buddhahood.
2 May 21, 08:19 PM
Joy: 2. From a Buddhist practitioner's point of view, why do we make physical offerings? How does making physical offering help to reduce our attachment?
- From a Buddhist practitioner’s point of view as a donor, they are essential means of reducing our attachment to the physical world.
- Attachment reinforces our notion of ourselves as real, independent selves to be satisfied by obtaining or clinging onto objects we desire.
- Making offerings accustoms the mind to giving and letting go of desirable objects. It serves to loosen our conception of a real and independent self.
2 May 21, 08:19 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Yee Mun
2 May 21, 08:19 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A3 : The value of an act of giving closely corresponds to the quality of motivation. The narrower the intention, the smaller the merit. You may offer a bag of gold to a monastery, but if your real intention is just to show off, to acquire further wealth or a similar worldly motivation, the merit acquired may provide the desired result, but no more. If you give with a wish to attain liberation from cyclic existence, much greater merit will be generated. And if by giving you aspire to the ultimate attainment of Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings, the merit you acquire will be limitless.
2 May 21, 08:19 PM
Pastor Antoinette: Good evening Callista and Joy
2 May 21, 08:18 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Callista
2 May 21, 08:18 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Antoinette for pointing out especially the motivation that we should have to maximize the effect of our giving
2 May 21, 08:18 PM
Callista: A3: The value = motivation. The narrower the intention, the smaller the merit. You may offer a bag of gold to a monastery, but if your real intention is just to show off, to acquire further wealth or a similar worldly motivation, the merit acquired may provide the desired result, but no more. If you give with a wish to attain liberation from cyclic existence, much greater merit will be generated. And if by giving you aspire to the ultimate attainment of Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings, the merit you acquire will be limitless.
2 May 21, 08:17 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Yee Mun, Jacinta and Callista. That is correct when we make offering or giving, we reduce our attachment.
2 May 21, 08:16 PM
Jacinta: A2. As Buddhist, making offering is a form of practice - the paramita of. generosity. From making offering, we will learn to be generous, we learn renunciation, and we will generate merits so as to further fuel our practice to achieve Enlightenment. From giving, we letting go of desirable objects. It serves to loosen our conception of a real and independent self. In this way, it contributes to our acquiring the essential wisdom realizing that all phenomena as empty of intrinsic existence.
2 May 21, 08:16 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A2 : From a Buddhist practitioner’s point of view as a donor, they are essential means of reducing our attachment to the physical world. Attachment reinforces our notion of ourselves as real, independent selves to be satisfied by obtaining or clinging onto objects we desire. Making offerings accustoms the mind to giving and letting go of desirable objects. It serves to loosen our conception of a real and independent self. In this way, it contributes to our acquiring the essential wisdom realizing that all phenomena as empty of intrinsic existence. Without such realization we will not attain Buddhahood.
2 May 21, 08:16 PM
Pastor Antoinette: 3. How does our motivation determine the value of the act of giving? Please give one example.

The value of an act of giving closely corresponds to the quality of motivation. The narrower the intention, the smaller the merit.

You may offer a bag of gold to a monastery, but if your real intention is just to show off, to acquire further wealth or a similar worldly motivation, the merit acquired may provide the desired result, but no more.
If you give with a wish to attain liberation from cyclic existence, much greater merit will be generated.
And if by giving you aspire to the ultimate attainment of Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings, the merit you acquire will be limitless.
2 May 21, 08:16 PM
Callista: A2:Physical offerings are essential means of reducing our attachment to the physical world. Attachment reinforces our notion of ourselves as real, independent selves to be satisfied by obtaining or clinging onto objects we desire. Making offerings accustoms the mind to giving and letting go of desirable objects. It serves to loosen our conception of a real and independent self. In this way, it contributes to our acquiring the essential wisdom realizing that all phenomena as empty of intrinsic existence. Without such realization we will not attain Buddhahood. The value of merit acquired from an act of giving depends on several factors: the motivation, the status of the recipient and the quality of the offering.
2 May 21, 08:16 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Shin
2 May 21, 08:15 PM
Pastor Shin: A1. Giving offerings to a higher being allows us to make a direct connection and plant seeds of enlightenment in our mind to achieve it in the future when we practice. On a more worldly level, making offerings is a direct cause for creating wealth and purifying poverty.

Knowing the meaning and reason behind making offerings to the Three Jewels is important to keep our faith stable. Through this knowledge, our enthusiasm to do dharma will be tremendous and tireless, which WILL then lead to inner transformation because all the obstacles that we face for Dharma is for a higher purpose.
2 May 21, 08:15 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Joy
2 May 21, 08:15 PM
Joy: 1. What are the benefits of making offerings to a higher being on a spiritual and worldly level? Why do we need to know the benefits of making an offering?
- Giving offerings to a higher being allows us to make a direct connection and plant seeds of enlightenment in our mind to achieve it in the future when we practice.
- On a more worldly level, making offerings is a direct cause for creating wealth and purifying poverty.
- Knowing the meaning and reason behind making offerings to the Three Jewels is important to keep our faith stable.
- Through this knowledge, our enthusiasm to do dharma will be tremendous and tireless, which WILL then lead to inner transformation because all the obstacles that we face for Dharma is for a higher purpose.
2 May 21, 08:14 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Callista and Yee Mun for your answer to question 1
2 May 21, 08:13 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A1 : Giving offerings to a higher being allows us to make a direct connection and plant seeds of enlightenment in our mind to achieve it in the future when we practice. On a more worldly level, making offerings is a direct cause for creating wealth and purifying poverty. Knowing the meaning and reason behind making offerings to the Three Jewels is important to keep our faith stable. Through this knowledge, our enthusiasm to do dharma will be tremendous and tireless, which WILL then lead to inner transformation because all the obstacles that we face for Dharma is for a higher purpose.
2 May 21, 08:13 PM
Valentina_moderator: 3. How does our motivation determine the value of the act of giving? Please give one example.
2 May 21, 08:13 PM
Valentina_moderator: For those who are ready, you can proceed to question 3
2 May 21, 08:12 PM
Pastor Antoinette: Good evening Yee Mun
2 May 21, 08:12 PM
Valentina_moderator: Good evening Yee Mun. Welcome to the chatroom :)
2 May 21, 08:12 PM
Callista: A1:Making offerings to higher beings is to collect merits.
Giving offerings to a higher being allows us to make a direct connection and plant seeds of enlightenment in our mind to achieve it in the future when we practice. On a more worldly level, making offerings is a direct cause for creating wealth and purifying poverty.
2 May 21, 08:12 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): Good evening Rinpoche, Valentina, Pastors and everyone.
2 May 21, 08:12 PM
Valentina_moderator: 1. What are the benefits of making offerings to a higher being on a spiritual and worldly level? Why do we need to know the benefits of making an offering?

ANS 1

The benefits of making offerings to a higher being:

> Spiritually, giving offerings to a higher being allows us to make a direct connection and plant seeds of enlightenment in our mind to achieve it in the future when we practice.

> On a more worldly level, making offerings is a direct cause for creating wealth and purifying poverty.

Knowing the meaning and reason behind making offerings to the Three Jewels is important to keep our faith stable. Through this knowledge, our enthusiasm to do dharma will be tremendous and tireless, which WILL then lead to inner transformation because all the obstacles that we face for Dharma are for a higher purpose.

2 May 21, 08:11 PM
Pastor Antoinette: Good evening Pastor Adeline!
2 May 21, 08:11 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Antoinette and Pastor Adeline. Pastor Adeline seems so cheerful hehe...
2 May 21, 08:11 PM
Pastor Adeline: Good evening beautiful people!!!
2 May 21, 08:11 PM
Pastor Antoinette: 2. From a Buddhist practitioner's point of view, why do we make physical offerings? How does making physical offering help to reduce our attachment?

From a Buddhist practitioner’s point of view as a donor, they are essential means of reducing our attachment to the physical world. Attachment reinforces our notion of ourselves as real, independent selves to be satisfied by obtaining or clinging onto objects we desire. Making offerings accustoms the mind to giving and letting go of desirable objects. It serves to loosen our conception of a real and independent self. In this way, it contributes to our acquiring the essential wisdom realizing that all phenomena as empty of intrinsic existence. Without such realization we will not attain Buddhahood.
2 May 21, 08:11 PM
Pastor Adeline: A2. Whether the physical offerings benefit the recipient or not, from a Buddhist practitioner’s point of view as a donor, they are essential means of reducing our attachment to the physical world. Attachment reinforces our notion of ourselves as real, independent selves to be satisfied by obtaining or clinging onto objects we desire. Making offerings accustoms the mind to giving and letting go of desirable objects. It serves to loosen our conception of a real and independent self. In this way, it contributes to our acquiring the essential wisdom realizing that all phenomena as empty of intrinsic existence. Without such realization we will not attain Buddhahood. The value of merit acquired from an act of giving depends on several factors: the motivation, the status of the recipient and the quality of the offering.
2 May 21, 08:10 PM
Valentina_moderator: Welcome to the chatroom Callista :)
2 May 21, 08:10 PM
Callista: Long time no see
2 May 21, 08:10 PM
Callista: Good evening Rinpoche, Pastors,Valentina and everyone
2 May 21, 08:10 PM
Valentina_moderator: Good evening Jacinta and Thank you Pastor Adeline :)
2 May 21, 08:10 PM
Pastor Adeline: A1. Giving offerings to a higher being allows us to make a direct connection and plant seeds of enlightenment in our mind to achieve it in the future when we practice. On a more worldly level, making offerings is a direct cause for creating wealth and purifying poverty.

Knowing the meaning and reason behind making offerings to the Three Jewels is important to keep our faith stable. Through this knowledge, our enthusiasm to do dharma will be tremendous and tireless, which WILL then lead to inner transformation because all the obstacles that we face for Dharma is for a higher purpose.
2 May 21, 08:10 PM
Jacinta: Good evening Pastor Antoinette, Moderator Valentina and Joy.
2 May 21, 08:09 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Jacinta :)
2 May 21, 08:09 PM
Valentina_moderator: Hi Joy, welcome to the chatroom :)
2 May 21, 08:09 PM
Jacinta: A1. We can make a direct connection and plant seeds of enlightenment in our mind to achieve it in the future. On worldly level, making offerings is a direct cause for creating wealth and purifying poverty.

Knowing the meaning and reason behind making offerings to the Three Jewels is important to keep our faith stable. Through this knowledge, our enthusiasm to do dharma will be tremendous and tireless, which will then lead to inner transformation because all the obstacles that we face for Dharma is for a higher purpose.
2 May 21, 08:09 PM
Joy: Hello everyone
2 May 21, 08:09 PM
Joy: Hello everyone
2 May 21, 08:08 PM
Valentina_moderator: 2. From a Buddhist practitioner's point of view, why do we make physical offerings? How does making physical offering help to reduce our attachment?
2 May 21, 08:07 PM
Valentina_moderator: Can proceed to question 2 when you are ready :)
2 May 21, 08:07 PM
Valentina_moderator: Good evening Jacinta - nice to see you here :)
2 May 21, 08:06 PM
Pastor Antoinette: Good evening Jacinta
2 May 21, 08:06 PM
Jacinta: Good evening Rinpoche, Pastors, Moderator and everyone here.
2 May 21, 08:05 PM
Valentina_moderator: Thank you Pastor Antoinette - you got it :)
2 May 21, 08:03 PM
Pastor Antoinette: 1. What are the benefits of making offerings to a higher being on a spiritual and worldly level? Why do we need to know the benefits of making an offering?

Giving offerings to a higher being allows us to make a direct connection and plant seeds of enlightenment in our mind to achieve it in the future when we practice. On a more worldly level, making offerings is a direct cause for creating wealth and purifying poverty.

Knowing the meaning and reason behind making offerings to the Three Jewels is important to keep our faith stable. Through this knowledge, our enthusiasm to do dharma will be tremendous and tireless, which WILL then lead to inner transformation because all the obstacles that we face for Dharma is for a higher purpose.
2 May 21, 08:02 PM
Valentina_moderator: Good evening Pastor Shin. Welcome to the chatroom :)
2 May 21, 08:02 PM
Valentina_moderator: 1. What are the benefits of making offerings to a higher being on a spiritual and worldly level? Why do we need to know the benefits of making an offering?
2 May 21, 08:02 PM
Pastor Shin: Good evening!
2 May 21, 08:02 PM
Valentina_moderator: ok let's start with the first question
2 May 21, 08:01 PM
Pastor Antoinette: Good evening Rinpoche, good evening Valentina and everyone
2 May 21, 08:00 PM
Valentina_moderator: Hi Pastor Antoinette - welcome to the chatroom
2 May 21, 08:00 PM
Valentina_moderator: Welcome to the this week's blog chat! Let's wait for a few more minute before we start
2 May 21, 07:25 PM
Valentina_moderator:
Looking forward to chatting with you…

Today’s blog chat topic is

A Note on Offerings by Panchen Ötrul Rinpoche

See you!!

https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=25632

25 Apr 21, 09:11 PM
Joy_Moderator: Good night everyone! 🙏🏼
25 Apr 21, 09:10 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): Thank you Rinpoche, Joy, Pastors and everyone. Good night and stay safe.
25 Apr 21, 09:10 PM
Pastor Shin: Thank you Rinpoche. Thank you Joy for moderating and thank you everyone for joining today. Nice to see new faces too hehe and do join us more regularly when you can. Have a good evening!
25 Apr 21, 09:10 PM
Liling: 👋👋👋Goodnite everyone.
25 Apr 21, 09:10 PM
doreent: Good nite, everyone, and thank you to Joy for moderating.
25 Apr 21, 09:10 PM
Joy_Moderator: Good to know @Doreen! 🤗😘
25 Apr 21, 09:09 PM
Andrea Lai: Ok, thank you Joy. Good night everyone
25 Apr 21, 09:09 PM
doreent: Snake, Rooster and Pig, was the book that got me into Kechara.
25 Apr 21, 09:09 PM
Fhsam: Thank you Rinpoche .....Joy and everyone Good night , stay safe
25 Apr 21, 09:09 PM
Joy_Moderator: We have come to an end of our blog chat. Thank you all for joining & please do your dedication!

We humble thank our dear Guru, H.E. the 25th Tsem Rinpoche for creating this blog chat with the wish for us to learn more Dharma and expand our mind. Thank you everyone and stay safe! 🙏 📿🙏📿🙏📿

25 Apr 21, 09:09 PM
Joy_Moderator: 7. How can we break a preconceived ideas and wrong projections of our Guru? And what is the right attitude should we have, how should we view every task he gives us?

- How to do so is simply to just trust our Guru. After we have taken refuge we need to trust the Guru’s training.
- Do not limit your Guru by having a preconceived idea of how a Guru should be.
- If you believe your Guru should be this way, act this way, do things this way or that Dharma should be this or that way, you are actually the one who is wrong because you are limiting your Guru and putting him in your preconceived wrong projections.
- When you know and realise this fully, you will trust the actions your Guru takes in relation to you and all his students. You see his every action as arising from an intent that came from many lifetimes of habituation and practice of benefiting others.
- Every task he gives you, every teaching you receive from him, every seeming negative action of his towards you is given with an intent (or comes from an intent) that arises from many lifetimes of habituation and practice. This intent has been shaped by the practice of love and compassion for many, many lifetimes.
25 Apr 21, 09:08 PM
Joy_Moderator: Thank you so much @Pastor Shin 🙏🏼
25 Apr 21, 09:08 PM
Joy_Moderator: Thank you @Andrea and YES @Lili you said it! 🙏🏼🌟👍🏼
25 Apr 21, 09:08 PM
Pastor Shin: A7. When we realise that we have preconceived ideas and wrong projections of our Guru, we have to recognise that all our teacher’s action are from the intent that arises from many lifetimes of habituation and practice. We have to trust the actions our Guru takes in relation to us and all his students, and to see his every action as arising from an intent that came from many lifetimes of habituation and practice of love and compassion.


We should never react angrily or negatively to the challenging situation posed by our teacher or how our teacher treat us. Every task our teacher gives us, every teaching we receive from him, or every seeming negative action of his towards us is given with an intent (or comes from an intent) that arises from many lifetimes of habituation and practice, shaped by the practice of love and compassion for many, many lifetimes.
25 Apr 21, 09:07 PM
Liling: yes,I believe having great faith in your Guru is very important,this will not make you question your Guru’s instructions.
25 Apr 21, 09:07 PM
Joy_Moderator: Thank you @Yee Mun
25 Apr 21, 09:07 PM
Andrea Lai: A7: When you have a fixed perception of how something should be, no other view can enter because you hold on to thinking and feeling that something must be in this way: this person has to be this way or that way. When you have such a fixed perception and you hold on strongly to how things should be, no other information can come through to you. You lose (as you can see from the example below). Your bad experiences arise only from your own wrong projections.

It is the Guru who teaches us that there is no “this way” or “that way”, beginning with our wrong fixed perception and projections of the Guru himself. If you believe your Guru should be this way, act this way, do things this way or that Dharma should be this or that way, you are actually the one who is wrong because there is no “this way” or “that way”. There is only intent that arises from many lifetimes of habituation and practice.

When you know and realise this fully, you will trust the actions your Guru takes in relation to you and all his students. You see his every action as arising from an intent that came from many lifetimes of habituation and practice. Every task he gives you, every teaching you receive from him, every seeming negative action of his towards you is given with an intent (or comes from an intent) that arises from many lifetimes of habituation and practice. This intent has been shaped by the practice of love and compassion for many, many lifetimes.
25 Apr 21, 09:07 PM
Yee Mun (KISG): A7 : If you believe your Guru should be this way, act this way, do things this way or that Dharma should be this or that way, you are actually the one who is wrong because there is no “this way” or “that way”. There is only intent that arises from many lifetimes of habituation and practice.

John Riley Perks, the devoted student of Chogyam Trungpa
John Riley Perks, the devoted student of Chogyam Trungpa

When you know and realise this fully, you will trust the actions your Guru takes in relation to you and all his students. You see his every action as arising from an intent that came from many lifetimes of habituation and practice. Every task he gives you, every teaching you receive from him, every seeming negative action of his towards you is given with an intent (or comes from an intent) that arises from many lifetimes of habituation and practice. This intent has been shaped by the practice of love and compassion for many, many lifetimes.
25 Apr 21, 09:05 PM
Joy_Moderator: Thank you @Sam 🌟👍🏼🌟👍🏼🌟👍🏼
25 Apr 21, 09:05 PM
Fhsam: 7. If you believe your Guru should be this way, act this way, do things this way or that Dharma should be this or that way, you are actually the one who is wrong because there is no “this way” or “that way”. There is only intent that arises from many lifetimes of habituation and practice.When you know and realise this fully, you will trust the actions your Guru takes in relation to you and all his students. You see his every action as arising from an intent that came from many lifetimes of habituation and practice. Every task he gives you, every teaching you receive from him, every seeming negative action of his towards you is given with an intent (or comes from an intent) that arises from many lifetimes of habituation and practice. This intent has been shaped by the practice of love and compassion for many, many lifetimes.
25 Apr 21, 09:04 PM
Joy_Moderator: Thank you @Valentina 🌟👍🏼🌟👍🏼🌟👍🏼
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